Solid Timber

Jatoba
Walnut

Solid wood flooring is milled from a single piece of timber that is kiln or air dried before sawing. Depending on the desired look of the floor, the timber can be cut in three ways: flat-sawn, quarter-sawn, and rift-sawn. The timber is cut to the desired dimensions and either packed unfinished for a site-finished installation or finished at the factory. The moisture content at time of manufacturing is carefully controlled to ensure the product doesn’t warp during transport and storage. There are a number of proprietary features for solid wood floors that are available. Many solid woods come with grooves cut into the back of the wood that run the length of each plank, often called ‘absorption strips,’ that are intended to reduce cupping. Solid wood floors are mostly manufactured 19mm (.75 inches) thick with a tongue-and-groove for installation.

Features

1.Tongue-and-groove: One side and one end of the plank have a groove, the other side and end have a tongue (protruding wood along an edge’s center). The tongue and groove fit snugly together, thus joining or aligning the planks, and are not visible once joined. Tongue-and-groove flooring can be installed by glue-down (both engineered and solid), or nail-down.

 

2.”Click” or Woodloc systems: A “click” floor is similar to tongue-and-groove, but instead of fitting directly into the groove, the board must be angled or “tapped” in to make the curved or barbed tongue fit into the modified. It is beneficial for the Do-It-Yourself market.

 

3.Floor connection system: There are a wide range of connection systems, as most of them are mill-specific manufacturing techniques. The general principle is to have grooves on all four sides of the plank with a separate, unconnected, piece that is inserted into the grooves of two planks to join them. The piece used for the connection can be made from wood, rubber, or plastic. This installation system allows for different materials (i.e. wood and metal) to be installed together if they have the same connection system.

 

4.Wood flooring can also be installed utilizing the glue-down method. This is an especially popular method for solid parquet flooring installations on concrete sub-floors. Additionally, engineered wood flooring may use the glue-down method as well. A layer of mastic is placed onto the sub-floor using a trowel similar to those used in laying ceramic tile. The wood pieces are then laid on top of the glue and hammered into place using a rubber mallet and a protected 2×4 to create a level floor. Often the parquet floor will require sanding and re-finishing after the glue-down installation method due to the small size pieces. 5.Floating installation: A floating installation is where the flooring is laid down in a glue less manner on top of a layer of underlay. The individual planks are locked together using a Woodloc system, and they are not glued or nailed down to the subfloor. By doing this the floor is floating above the underlay, and can be laid on top of existing tile or marble, without the risk of damaging the subflooring.

Benefits

  • Largest range of species, colours and grain patterns
  • Long lasting and hard wearing
  • Easy to maintain
  • Installation over existing timber, sheet floor, battens and concrete
  • Can be re-stained to change the floor colour
  • Solid timber – a renewable resourceLow manufacturing environment impact

Tel

JHB +27114660701

CPT +27214613565

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